Can you plant Okra in a Container? (If Yes! How many seeds to grow in one hole?)

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Can you plant Okra in a Container? One of those foods that people either adore or detest is okra. Although they have a pleasant vegetal flavor, some people find the slimy texture to be too much. Okra is nevertheless a useful crop that is surprisingly simple to cultivate, provided you can feed it with plenty of warmth and sunlight. Okra is difficult for gardeners to cultivate in containers because it expands quickly and can occasionally grow to exceed 6 feet tall. 

Okra should be planted in a 5-gallon (19-L) container or bigger per plant. You have two options: direct sowing or starting your seeds indoors four to six weeks forward to your final date of frost and transplanting them once the soil has warmed to 65°F (18°C). Because okra is a warm-weather crop, relocate your pots to the area of your garden that receives the most sunlight.

Can you plant Okra in a Container? – Growing Okra in Containers: How to Do It?

Transplanting versus direct sowing

Okra can be sown directly outside or indoors and then transplanted outside later. Okra flourishes in warmer climates, therefore you should start your seeds indoors if you reside somewhere with a short growing season. You can direct sow outdoors if you live in a warm region, like the South of the United States.

Planting Okra in Containers: When and How?

Okra seeds should be sown indoors 1/2 to 1 inch (1.25 to 2.5 cm) deep, approximately 4 to 6 weeks before your typical last frost date. Plant two to three seeds per hole, and when they sprout, thin them to just one seedling. Keep them warm and under grow lights while you’re inside.

Once the soil has warmed to about 65°F (18°C), transplant your okra seedlings and water them.

Again, for direct planting, plant 2 to 3 seeds approximately 1/2 to 1 inch deep, and then thin them down afterward. If you keep them covered in transparent plastic, a cold frame, or row covers to shield them from the cold, you can sow once the soil has warmed up or a few weeks before your last frost date.

You can soak your okra seeds overnight for either approach to hasten germination.

For more such plant related-articles, you may also read, 12 Fertilizers for a heavy Okra Harvest

Caring Tips

Okra is a resilient plant that can grow in a variety of environments, but it thrives in warm climates—the warmer, the better—and prefers rich, well-draining soil. For optimal results, place your container in direct sunlight.

In general, established plants growing in containers will quickly absorb most of the water, necessitating more frequent watering. With okra, this is, even more, the case. As your okra becomes bigger, water frequently, at least 1 inch (2.5 cm) of water per week, and even more in the heat. Never allow your okra plants to dry out completely.

Fertilizing

Despite being a prolific feeder, okra gains from any fertilizer that is properly balanced. Before planting, you can apply a slow-release fertilizer, such as Dr. Earth’s fertilizer or Jobe’s fertilizer spikes. Additionally, you can feed your plants every 7 to 14 days with liquid fertilizers like Miracle-Gro or fish emulsion.

A balanced fertilizer will do for NPK. But as the season progresses and your first blooms and pods appear, you can switch to a blooming formula (higher P and K in the N-P-K numbers).

Harvest

Okra can be harvested at any time of the year; therefore, you must continuously harvest it. Similar to green beans, the more okra you pick, the more the plant will produce, and by the end of the season, you will have quite heavy yields. Up until the first frost, okra will still be produced.

Depending on the variety, you should usually pick okra when the pods are between 1 and 4 inches long and still quite tender. Okra pods mature incredibly quickly, so once you notice little pods beginning to form, keep an eye on them every day since they will grow swiftly.

You might need to check your okra plants every one to two days if they start to grow well. If you only have a few okra plants, you can store the pods in the freezer until you have enough to prepare your favorite okra dish. 

Container and Seeds: Size and Quantity

Start with a big enough container, at least 10 to 12 inches (25-31 cm) in diameter, to grow okra in pots or containers. The plant can be top-heavy; therefore, it is recommended to use a wide-bottomed container. ensure the chosen container has a drainage hole on the bottom.

You must sow the seeds straight into a pot or biodegradable container due to the plant’s taproot. In each pot, plant 2 to 3 okra seeds at a depth of between 1/2 and 1 inch. The substrate should stay moist until the seeds germinate; moisten the seeds with a sprayer and set them in a sunny, warm location.

Conclusion

Okra can be sown directly outside or indoors and then transplanted outside later. Okra flourishes in warmer climates, therefore you should start your seeds indoors if you reside somewhere with a short growing season. You can direct sow outdoors if you live in a warm region, like the South of the United States.

Thanks for reading! Happy gardening!

Becky Decker