Pothos Root Rot (Signs, Causes, and Treatment)

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Pothos is one of the easiest plants to grow at home as a houseplant. Even these plants get diseased by a fungal disease named root rot. Root rot is a serious problem that can quickly kill your plants. The condition is caused by a variety of fungi, bacteria, and other organisms that invade the roots and begin to break down the plant tissue. Pothos root rot typically affects plants that are already stressed or damaged in some way.

Pothos root rot is caused because of the overwatering of the plants, less supply of water, nutrient deficiency, lack of fertilizer, moisture in the soil, poor drainage in the pots, and many more. Some of the signs that can be seen in the pothos when they suffer from root rot are the brown leaves on the plant, black spots on the leaves, etc. They can be treated by following the guide.

The fungi and other organisms take advantage of the plant’s weakened state and begin to spread, causing further damage. Pothos root rot can be difficult to treat, but it is important to act quickly if you think your plant has the condition. In this blog post, we will discuss the signs, causes, and treatment of pothos root rot.

Pothos Root Rot (Signs, Causes, and Treatment)

Are you worried about the rotted roots of the Pothos? If yes, then it is important to know the signs, causes, and even the treatment behind the Pothos root rot. They are as follows:

1. Dampness of Soil

As the name suggests, pothos root rot is caused by too much moisture in the soil. One of the reasons behind the Pothos root rot is the dampness of the soil. This can be due to overwatering, poor drainage, or even high humidity. If the roots are constantly wet, they will start to break down and rot. This can happen quickly or over time, depending on the conditions.

Pothos root rot is a serious problem because it can kill the plant. The first signs of root rot are usually yellowing leaves, wilting, and stunted growth. If you see these signs, it’s important to act quickly. The best way to treat root rot is to let the soil dry out completely. This will kill the fungus and help the roots to heal.

If your plant is already showing signs of root rot, you may need to repot it into fresh soil. Be sure to clean all of the old soil off of the roots before replanting. You can also try using a fungicide to help prevent the further spread of the disease.

causes of pothos root rot

2. Fungus or Mold on Soil

Another cause of pothos root rot is the fungus in the soil. If you notice any dark spots or patches on your pothos plant’s leaves, it could be a sign of root rot.

Take a closer look at the roots and soil to see if there is any fungus or mold present. If you do see mold or fungus, this is likely the cause of the root rot.

To treat root rot caused by fungus or mold, you’ll need to remove the affected roots and soil and replace it with a fresh, sterile potting mix. You may also need to treat the plant with a fungicide to prevent further infection.

3. Delayed Growth

If you’re noticing that your pothos isn’t growing as quickly as it used to, it could be a sign of root rot. Root rot is a serious infection that can kill your plant if left untreated.

Symptoms of root rot include:

-Yellowing or wilting leaves
-Slow growth
-Brown or black roots

If you suspect your plant has root rot, it’s important to act quickly. Remove the plant from its pot and inspect the roots. If they are brown or black, it’s likely the plant has root rot. Cut away any infected roots and repot the plant in fresh soil.

Root rot is caused by overwatering. Be sure to water your pothos only when the soil is dry to the touch. Allow the plant to drain thoroughly after watering and never leave it sitting in water. If you live in an area with high humidity, consider using a humidifier to raise the air around your plant.

4. Pathogenic Infections

Pothos root rot is a serious problem for pothos plants. This fungal infection attacks the roots of the plant, causing them to rot. The fungus then spreads to the stem and leaves, causing the plant to wilt and die.

Several different types of fungi can cause pothos root rot, but the most common is Phytophthora infestans. This fungus thrives in wet, humid conditions and can quickly spread through a pothos plant.

Symptoms of pothos root rot include yellowing leaves, wilting, and stunted growth. The leaves may also curl up and fall off the plant. If the infection is severe, the entire plant may die.

Pothos root rot is difficult to treat once it has started. The best way to prevent it is to water your pothos plant carefully and avoid overhead watering. If you think your plant has root rot, remove it from the pot and inspect the roots. If they are black or brown and mushy, then your plant has root rot and should be disposed of.

5. Poor Drainage in Pots

One of the most common causes of root rot in pothos plants is poor drainage. When water sits in the pot, it can start to break down the roots and cause them to rot. If you notice that your plant is wilting or the leaves are turning yellow, it could be a sign that the roots are starting to rot.

To prevent this, make sure that you are using a well-draining pot and that you are not overwatering your plant. If you think that your plant has root rot, there are a few things that you can do to try and save it.

Other tips to follow
1. Make a proper watering schedule for the pothos 
2. Add sandy soil into the soil to increase the drainage and lose up the compactness of the soil
3. Use clean or sterilize cutting or carving tools for the plant. 

How does root rot occur? 

1. Too much water in the soil 

Being an indoor plant, pothos grows well in less water. Too much water can affect the pothos just like any other indoor plant. Though the pothos can grow well in only water but the soil if overwatered can be an issue.

Through the water, you can easily see the structure of the roots if they are right or not but through the soil, you can easily see the roots.

You should if you are overwatering the pothos. Too much water in the soil will suffocate the roots due to less oxygen and the roots will not be able to breathe. 

2. Drainage issues 

Even though you are not overwatering the plants, the soil stays soggy due to the poor drainage ability of the soil. The soil when there is too much clayey gets firm and compact, water is not able to move freely through the soil particles.

The water keeps standing in the soil and brings mold growth or fungal growth. The water pool in the soil can affect the plants and also the roots. 

3. Pot and pot size 

The pot can be creating problems for your pothos plant. Actually, the pot if it does not have a good number of drainage holes can cause rot on the roots.

Even if the pot’s size is small the roots will stay bounded to limited spaces and roots need good space to breathe.

The water will not drain well. The pot size being large can again make you overwater the plant easily. So use the right size of pot for the pothos. 

4. Fertilizing too much 

Too much application of fertilizer can affect the roots and cause root rot.  

5. Infections 

The reason can be the pothos plants are infected already or plant parts affected by pathogen infection or fungal infection leads to the roots and infected them as well. The root will rot drastically.

For example, the phytophthora caused by mold, pythium root rot caused by a pathogen, and pathogenic fungus like Rhizoctonia, affect the pothos plant, especially their roots, and cause root rot in them.  

How to fix root rot in pothos? 

Step 1: As the roots are damaged, you need to take the plant out of the pot so you can examine the roots properly.

Step 2: Now brush the excess dirt and soil from the roots. Wash the roots thoroughly. 

Step 3: Check which of the roots are damaged and rotten badly, trim the roots, cut them, or remove those roots from the root system. 

Step 4: Now using a mild soap solution, clean the remaining roots

Step 5: Place the plant in the fungicidal solution and thoroughly rinse it. You must also remove the affected leaves that are wilted already. 

Step 6: Use a clean sterilized pot and repot the plant into the soil. Make sure you are using the new soil for the plant. The pot must have a good number of holes and drainage. 

Step 7: Water the plant properly and check if the soil is draining water properly. Don’t overwater the plant. Add fertilizer occasionally and in a light amount, to keep it thriving. You can also propagate the pothos if the roots are badly affected. 

Concluding lines

In this guide, you come to know that Pothos root rot is caused because of the overwatering of the plants, less supply of water, nutrient deficiency, lack of fertilizer, moisture in the soil, poor drainage in the pots, and many more. Some of the signs that can be seen in the pothos when they suffer from root rot are the brown leaves on the plant, black spots on the leaves, etc.

The fungi and other organisms take advantage of the plant’s weakened state and begin to spread, causing further damage. Pothos root rot can be difficult to treat, but it is important to act quickly if you think your plant has the condition. In this blog post, we will discuss the signs, causes, and treatment of pothos root rot. Read the guide for more.

Thanks for reading! Happy gardening!

FAQs

1. How do you fix root rot on pothos?

If your pothos is suffering from root rot, the first thing you need to do is remove it from the potting mix. Gently rinse the roots with water to remove any remaining potting mix and inspect them for signs of rotting.
If the roots are soft and mushy, they will need to be cut away. Once you have removed the rotten roots, replant your pothos in a fresh potting mix and water well. Be sure to keep an eye on your pothos and check the roots periodically to ensure they are not rotting again.

2. What causes root rot in pothos?

Root rot is caused by a variety of fungi, including Phytophthora, Pythium, and Rhizoctonia. These fungi are often found in soil and water and can infect pothos plants through the roots. Once the fungus has infected the roots, it begins to break down the tissue, causing the roots to rot.

3. What does a pothos with root rot look like?

When a pothos plant has root rot, the leaves will begin to wilt and turn yellow. The stems may also discolor and the roots will start to rot. If the plant is not treated, it will eventually die.

4. Can root rot fix itself?

The best course of action is to prevent root rot from happening in the first place by ensuring that your pothos plant has well-draining soil and isn’t overwatered. If you do notice signs of root rot, such as yellowing leaves or stunted growth, it’s important to act quickly.
Remove the affected plant from its pot and dispose of any infected roots. Then, replant the pothos in fresh, well-draining soil. Be sure to water it properly (avoiding overwatering) and keep an eye out for any further signs of root rot. With proper care, your pothos should recover from root rot and continue to thrive.

Becky Decker